Thursday, August 10, 2017

A RECKLESS ATTACK



             Tony and Teena were recently married couples. They lived in a South Indian village. A month after their wedding, Tony had to go abroad to work in a foreign country. There was no one to stay with Teena. Her close friend, Meena invited her to stay with her. Teena closed their house and moved to her friend’s house in the town. Meena had a small child, who was very fond of Teena. Teena was very affectionate to the child and was eager to look after every need of the child with tender love and care.
             Tony returned to their home after several months. Teena and Tony reopened their house, cleaned it and started to live there. The next day, he went to town and could return only by dusk. When he neared their house, he heard the loud sound of Teena. Obviously, she was on the phone, speaking to someone. Out of curiosity, Tony secretly listened to the words of his wife. He was shocked to hear her words. She was talking very affectionately to someone on the phone and stated that she loved that person more than anything else in this world. She even made the sound of a loving kiss. Tony could not bear this. He believed that she had a secret lover and was sharing intimate moments with him. Furiously, he grabbed a heavy stick and gave an unexpected heavy blow on her head. She gave a loud cry and fell down, fainted. Filled with rage, Tony took the phone and listened silently, hoping to identify the criminal. There was a repeated  enquiry from an excited lady through the phone, “Teena, Teena, what happened to you?”
             Tony asked her, “Who are you?” The caller introduced herself as Meena, the close friend of Teena. She said, “Teena was talking to my child for a long time and I was listening to their intimate talk. Suddenly, Teena made a loud cry and stopped her talk. What happened?”
             Tony was totally upset. He realized that he had foolishly misunderstood his wife and misinterpreted her sweet talk to the innocent infant. He felt extremely sorry for reacting impulsively to Teena’s innocent act of affection and inflicting a serious injury on his dear and loving wife.
             Teena was rushed to the hospital in his car. She had to undergo a major surgery. After weeks of intensive treatment, she recovered and returned to their home, but her hair had to be shaved off prior to the surgery. Her head retained marks of the trauma.  
              A moment of misunderstanding or misinterpretation may be very disastrous and may make a couple forget the millions of memorable moments in their life and lead to erroneous or dangerous conclusions and decisions. It is wrong to draw conclusions until we know all the facts. His Grace the Most Rev. Philipose Mar Chrysostom Mar Thoma Valiya Metropolitan and former Head of the Mar Thoma Syrian Church, once remarked humorously, “Three unmarried girls are responsible for most of the troubles in the world. These miscreants are: Misunderstanding, Misinterpretation and Misrepresentation.” Because these three words start with ‘Mis’, they were described humorously by the Metropolitan as ‘Miss’ troublemakers.
              Prejudice, discrimination, racism,  judgement by external appearances and impulsive reactions have plagued humanity for centuries. Such biased judgements do not reflect truth or reality. We must use just judgement and intelligent interpretations to arrive at sensible conclusions and wise decisions.
              When we point one finger at another person, three other fingers on the same hand point towards us. Often we fail to notice our own imperfections when we watch the defects and sins of others. When we are harsh in judging others, we become unable to receive mercy and compassion.
              Let us remember that ‘ANGER’ is only one letter short of ‘DANGER’. Robert Green Ingersoll said, “Anger blows out the lamp of the mind.” Benjamin Franklin said, “Whatever is begun in anger ends in shame.” Lord Buddha taught, “Holding on to anger is like grasping a hot coal with the intent of throwing it at someone else; you are the one who gets burnt.”                      
             Let us seek God’s blessings and request Him to purify our heads, hearts, hands and habits.
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© By: Prof. Dr. Babu Philip, Former Professor, Cochin University of Science & Technology, Fine Arts Avenue, Kochi-682016, Kerala, India, Prof. Mrs. Rajamma Babu, Former Professor, St. Dominic's College, Kanjirappally, Leo. S. John and Neil John, Maniparambil, Alfeen Public School, Kanjirappally, Kerala, India. 
For more moral stories, parables and anecdotes for students kindly visit our web-site: http://www.moral-stories.com

This is Story No. 239 in this site. Please click ‘Older Posts’ at the bottom of a page to read previous stories and click 'Newer Posts' at the bottom of a page to read newer stories in this site. Please click on a word in the 'Story Themes' to read stories on that theme. 

Friday, April 7, 2017

THE SECRET SPICE



                 A girl was watching her mother cooking a dish in the kitchen. On the shelf, there were several containers, neatly labelled, each containing a component like salt, sugar, oil, vinegar or a spice. She opened the lids of the containers in a definite order and added the required amount of each ingredient into the cooking vessel which was heated on a stove. Finally, she opened a container and looked inside for a while and then closed it. Then she served the delicious dish to everyone with great love. The children relished the dishes with a smile. This happened every day.
                 One day, the mother was too sick to cook. Her daughter agreed to do the cooking. She followed the mother’s recipe. The girl examined the labels of every container while trying to follow the directions of her mother. She found that the last vessel did not carry a label and so ignored it. She placed the cooking vessel on the stove and put on the flame.
                 When the dish was getting ready, out of curiosity, she opened the unlabelled vessel, which her mother used to open, observe and close like a ritual every day. She was surprised to find in that vessel, a small card on which was written a short verse from the Holy Bible, “Do all your work in love” {1 Corinthians 16: 14}.
                 Now she realised how her mother used to serve their food with love every time after reading the message in the last vessel.
                 A favourite motto of St. Mother Teresa of Kolkata (1910 – 1997) was: "Do small things with great love."
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© By: Prof. Dr. Babu Philip, Former Professor, Cochin University of Science & Technology, Fine Arts Avenue, Kochi-682016, Kerala, India, Prof. Mrs. Rajamma Babu, Former Professor, St. Dominic's College, Kanjirappally, Leo. S. John and Neil John, Maniparambil, Alfeen Public School, Kanjirappally, Kerala, India. 
For more moral stories, parables and anecdotes for students kindly visit our web-site: http://www.moral-stories.com

This is Story No. 238 in this site. Please click ‘Older Posts’ at the bottom of a page to read previous stories and click 'Newer Posts' at the bottom of a page to read newer stories in this site. Please click on a word in the 'Story Themes' to read stories on that theme. 

PARABLE OF THE PENCIL



             In the earlier days of space research, a space research centre had to devise a method to enable astronauts to write in the special conditions of outer space such as zero-gravity. A team of scientists proposed an expensive project to develop special pens for use in space. While the proposal was being presented before the staff, a young scientist stood up and asked, “I have a humble suggestion. Instead of spending such a large amount to develop a special pen, why don’t we try to use an ordinary pencil?” The suggestion was received with great applause. Initial trials proved that a pencil could work well in conditions of zero-gravity and some early space travellers used it. Later, it was feared that the fine particles of graphite from the eroding lead can conduct electricity and may adversely affect the operation of delicate electronic control systems in the closed conditions of a space-ship and so better substitutes were fabricated.

              A great teacher gifted a pencil to each of his students and asked them to list the lessons of life that they could learn from a pencil. The major messages they presented were the following:

1…Each pencil has a definite purpose. It draws a line as it moves forward. This line becomes specific letters, words, phrases, sentences and a finally, a unique presentation with a meaningful message.
 Every person is a special noble creation of God with a particular purpose, role and mission in the world. By our life and actions, we have to fulfill the intention of the Creator.

2…A pencil permits to be held and guided by a hand to perform with perfection.
We must be ready to be guided by the will, words and hands of God. We must be humble and ready to surrender ourselves to the will of God. That is the only way to achieve great things in life.

3…A pencil leaves a definite mark on the surface on which it moves.
By doing our duties with dedication, we must leave our mark on every situation we are involved in and every person we interact with. That is the mark of our Creator which He uses to change the world through each of us.

4…The most important part of a pencil is its inside. The lead made of graphite is what enables it to leave a mark on the surface on which it moves. The decorated outer wooden portion may have visible beauty, but appearances can be deceptive. The quality of the pencil is decided by the inner lead.
The eternal soul within us is more important than the perishable body which houses it. The inner beauty and virtue of a person cannot be judged by his external appearance.

5…A pencil is used along with an eraser. Sometimes, the eraser is attached to the other end of a pencil. Though a mark of correction may remain, the eraser enables immediate correction of any mistake made.
We may make mistakes in life as “to err is human”. But a noble man corrects his error at the earliest. We must learn from our mistakes and proceed in pursuit of perfection.

6…A pencil has to be sharpened and polished frequently to serve its function with perfection.
Human life requires occasional painful sharpening to achieve its goal. Sharpening of human life is through the adversities and painful experiences man may have to endure in life. They lead to physical, mental and spiritual strengthening and regeneration. Adversity is the best university.

7…Applying too much pressure on a pencil while writing can break the tip of the lead causing great damage and hindrance to smooth writing.
Unnecessary stress and strain from vaulting ambition may damage our life and progress. When we are ready to accept the will of God, life becomes steady, pleasant and enjoyable.
             St. Mother Teresa of Kolkata said, “We are all pencils in the hand of God.” 
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© By: Prof. Dr. Babu Philip, Former Professor, Cochin University of Science & Technology, Fine Arts Avenue, Kochi-682016, Kerala, India, Prof. Mrs. Rajamma Babu, Former Professor, St. Dominic's College, Kanjirappally, Leo. S. John and Neil John, Maniparambil, Alfeen Public School, Kanjirappally, Kerala, India. 
For more moral stories, parables and anecdotes for students kindly visit our web-site: http://www.moral-stories.com

This is Story No. 237 in this site. Please click ‘Older Posts’ at the bottom of a page to read previous stories and click 'Newer Posts' at the bottom of a page to read newer stories in this site. Please click on a word in the 'Story Themes' to read stories on that theme. 

Monday, April 3, 2017

POETS IN PAIN


                Robert Browning (1812 – 1889), was a renowned English poet and play-wright, one of the foremost Victorian poets known for his great works such as ‘The Pied Piper of Hamelin’. Elizabeth Barret (1806 – 1861), daughter of Edward Moulton Barrett was one of the most prominent English poets of the Victorian era, popular in Britain and the United States during her lifetime.
                She started writing poems at the young age of six. At the age of fifteen she became sick with immobility and intense pain in her head and spine following a riding accident and later developed severe lung problems, possibly due to tuberculosis. She was administered pain-killers derived from opium such as morphine which intensified her illness. She was mostly bedridden. Still she wrote excellent poems. She was the eldest of twelve children. Her father had forbidden his children to marry. Impressed by the quality of her poetry and out of sympathy for her disability, Robert Browning loved her intensely. They used to correspond regularly through letters. As her father would not approve their marriage, they married secretly in 1846 and migrated to Italy. Her father was angry at her and refused to communicate with her forever. He rejected her only son and cut her from his will. But she used to write to her father frequently, begging his pardon. But he refused to open or read her letters.
                On the day of their 11th wedding anniversary, she received a packet from her father. Hoping that her father had finally forgiven her and sent her a loving gift, she gladly opened the packet. She was shocked to find in that packet all the letters she had sent him during the last ten years, begging his forgiveness, returned, still unopened. Robert Browning read those letters and remarked painfully, “Had he opened and read at least one of these loving letters, he would definitely have forgiven us and loved us.” Elizabeth Barrett died in Florence, in her husband's arms.
                Jesus taught His disciples to pray, “Forgive us the wrongs we have done, as we forgive the wrongs that others have done to us.” When God forgives us, He casts our sins into the sea of everlasting forgetfulness. Billy Graham said that many of the patients in hospitals would be healed if they were ready to forgive and forget the errors of others. Alexander Pope, in his work, ‘An Essay on Criticism’, wrote: “To err is human; to forgive divine.”
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© By: Prof. Dr. Babu Philip, Former Professor, Cochin University of Science & Technology, Fine Arts Avenue, Kochi-682016, Kerala, India, Prof. Mrs. Rajamma Babu, Former Professor, St. Dominic's College, Kanjirappally, Leo. S. John and Neil John, Maniparambil, Alfeen Public School, Kanjirappally, Kerala, India. 
For more moral stories, parables and anecdotes for students kindly visit our web-site: http://www.moral-stories.com

This is Story No. 236 in this site. Please click ‘Older Posts’ at the bottom of a page to read previous stories and click 'Newer Posts' at the bottom of a page to read newer stories in this site. Please click on a word in the 'Story Themes' to read stories on that theme. 

Sunday, April 2, 2017

AN ALTRUISTIC ANGEL



               A very poor girl was working as a nurse in a private hospital. A patient admitted to the hospital suddenly became seriously ill and had to be shifted to a major hospital to save his life. The administrator of the hospital insisted that the patient could be discharged only after he had paid his dues completely. The amount in the bill was too big for that poor family. They requested that they may be allowed some time to raise the amount as they were very poor and the patient was critically ill. But the administrator was adamant. The patient’s wife was in tears.
               The nurse, who had just arrived for duty, learned the gravity of the situation and made a personal plea to the administrator. But the management wanted the money immediately and was not ready to show any mercy. She quickly removed her golden bangle and deposited it in the cash counter and asked to discharge the patient without any delay. The critically ill patient was then shifted to the major hospital and his life was saved. The bangle was her only valuable possession but she was ready to donate it to save a poor patient.
               The bold and timely action of the loving nurse caught the attention of the doctor on duty. He was immensely impressed by her charity. He was a very rich man but was reluctant to act when the patient’s life was in danger. He was enlightened by her act of affection. He told his friend, Dr. D. John, “Today I saw God. He is a girl!”
               The wealthy doctor went home and told his parents about his desire to marry the nurse. His loving parents accepted the proposal and held discussions with the nurse and her parents. Their wedding was celebrated in the presence of their friends and relatives. This incident was quoted by Dr. D. John during a talk in Shalom TV.
               Jesus taught, “My commandment is this: love one another, just as I love you. The greatest love a person can have for his friends is to give his life for them” 
               Love is the language that can be heard by the deaf, seen by the blind and felt even by the new-born and the mentally retarded.
               We may give without loving; but we cannot love without giving. Love is giving all we can. Love is like a smile - neither have any value unless given away. Karl Menninger said, "Love cures people - both the ones who give it and the ones who receive it." Mother Teresa said, "It is not how much you do, but how much love you put into what you do that counts."
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© By: Prof. Dr. Babu Philip, Former Professor, Cochin University of Science & Technology, Fine Arts Avenue, Kochi-682016, Kerala, India, Prof. Mrs. Rajamma Babu, Former Professor, St. Dominic's College, Kanjirappally, Leo. S. John and Neil John, Maniparambil, Alfeen Public School, Kanjirappally, Kerala, India. 
For more moral stories, parables and anecdotes for students kindly visit our web-site: http://www.moral-stories.com

This is Story No. 235 in this site. Please click ‘Older Posts’ at the bottom of a page to read previous stories and click 'Newer Posts' at the bottom of a page to read newer stories in this site. Please click on a word in the 'Story Themes' to read stories on that theme.