Tuesday, January 6, 2015

New Year Greetings


AN EXPERIMENT WITH TRUTH


                     A lady came to a store with a cold storage facility and asked for a dressed chicken. The shop keeper searched in his freezer and found that only a single chicken was left. It weighed one and a half kilograms. He carried it to the lady and told her its weight and the price. She thought for a moment and said, “I need a larger one. Please give me one weighing at least two kilograms.” The shopkeeper decided to fool her. He carried the chicken back to the freezer, pretended to search within it and returned with the same piece. He told her, “You can have this larger piece. It weighs two kilograms.” The lady thought for a while and said, “OK, I will take it. But as I expect a few visitors today, I can’t take a risk. Please give me the other piece also - the one you replaced in the freezer just now.” The shopkeeper was lost for words.
                     We should speak only the truth. When words are manipulated to get our own way, even deviating from truth and righteousness, we go wrong. Honesty is the best policy. It is a good rule that we should be faithful and truthful in every action - both big and small. 
                     We should not tell a lie even if telling the truth may cause loss, suffering or pain. We should not tell a lie even if telling the lie may give us money, power or pleasure. Lying is an ugly blot on a person’s character, but ignorant people do it all the time. A thief is better than a habitual liar, but both are headed for ruin. A liar has no honour. He lives in constant disgrace
                     God sees everything we do. Wherever we go, he is watching. He sees what happens everywhere; He is watching us, whether we do good or evil.


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© By: Prof. Dr. Babu Philip, Darsana Academy, Kottayam-686001, Kerala, India ( Former Professor, Cochin University of Science & Technology, Fine Arts Avenue, Kochi-682016, Kerala, India), Prof. Mrs. Rajamma Babu, Former Professor, St. Dominic's College, Kanjirappally,  Leo. S. John, St. Antony's Public School, Anakkal, Kanjirappally and Neil John, Maniparambil, Ooriyakunnath, Kunnumbhagom, Kanjirappally, Kottayam-686507, Kerala, India.
For more moral stories, parables and anecdotes for students kindly visit our web-site:

This is Story No. 222 in this site. Please click ‘Older Posts’ at the bottom of a page to read previous stories and click 'Newer Posts' at the bottom of a page to read newer stories in this site. Please click on a word in the 'Story Themes' to read stories on that theme. 

Wednesday, December 3, 2014

FISH AND FROG


                      A boy in a south Indian village wanted to make an aquarium at home. He cleaned a wide-mouthed glass jar and layered some washed sand and gravel into it. He also planted some aquatic plants in it. He filled it with water and went to the stream near his residence. Using a coarse towel he collected a few small fishes from the stream and transferred them to his jar. He maintained and fed the animals with care and affection. He spent a lot of time watching the graceful movements of the animals swimming by the lateral undulation of their large and flattened tail.

                      A few days later, he observed tiny outgrowths on either side of the animals. They grew like legs. Later an additional pair of projections appeared which grew like hands. Later the long tail shortened and appeared like little stubs. The boy was filled with wonder and sought the opinion of his father about the unusual changes in his pet fish.

                      The father explained to him that the animals he collected were not small fishes but small tadpoles in the larval stage in the life cycle of a frog. He explained the appearance of legs and hands and the disappearance of the tail as the visible signs of metamorphosis. Soon the froglets reached full maturity and jumped out of the jar.  The boy watched with wonder how his pets jumped away in search of a new land. His father consoled him and used the occasion to tell him about the inevitable end of human life. “We too will die one day and move away with a transformed body from this world to our real abode in heaven to meet our creator, the loving God.”

                      Life after death is a reality. In the heaven of happiness reserved for the righteous, we will meet our loving Lord who created us to be with Him forever. It reminds us that we have only a limited time on earth in the joyous journey to heaven. God guides us throughout this travel through His teachings in the Holy Scriptures. If we proceed with a firm faith in God, we can overcome difficult situations and make this journey of life joyful and fruitful.

                      King Philip of Macedonia had appointed a servant in his palace, with the duty to meet him every morning and greet him with the words, “Philip, remember that you must die.”
                     'Death' is the Damocles' sword for all mortals. Death often appears unexpectedly. At every moment of life, we must be prepared for this impending end. Life is short and all worldly riches and luxury have to be left behind when we die. They give only a temporary joy. Sinful indulgence in worldly pleasures may lead to everlasting agony in a hell of horror.
                      It is said that when we are born, we cry and the people around us rejoice. When we die, people cry, and, if we are saved, we rejoice! Calvin Miller said, “Death is but a temporary inconvenience that separates our smaller living from our greater being.” Sir Walter Scott said, “Is death the last sleep? No, it is the final awakening.” 

                      At his deathbed, Alexander the Great instructed his close associates to leave his hands hanging free on either side of the coffin during his royal funeral procession. That was to teach the world that he could carry nothing with him on his final journey.
                      Man’s way leads to a hopeless end while God’s way leads to an endless hope. Let us plan ahead for the unavoidable departure from this world. Death is the universal equalizer. Everyone is equal before death as death comes to all - great and small. ……………………………………………………………..
© By: Prof. Dr. Babu Philip, Darsana Academy, Kottayam-686001, Kerala, India ( Former Professor, Cochin University of Science & Technology, Fine Arts Avenue, Kochi-682016, Kerala, India), Prof. Mrs. Rajamma Babu, Former Professor, St. Dominic's College, Kanjirappally,  Leo. S. John, St. Antony's Public School, Anakkal, Kanjirappally and Neil John, Maniparambil, Ooriyakunnath, Kunnumbhagom, Kanjirappally, Kottayam-686507, Kerala, India.
For more moral stories, parables and anecdotes for students kindly visit our web-site:

This is Story No. 221 in this site. Please click ‘Older Posts’ at the bottom of a page to read previous stories and click 'Newer Posts' at the bottom of a page to read newer stories in this site. Please click on a word in the 'Story Themes' to read stories on that theme. 

Monday, October 27, 2014

THE SHARING SIBLING


                             One afternoon, a wealthy man was waiting for the train in a railway station in south India. A poor boy in torn clothes approached him and begged for some money. He said he was very hungry and did not get anything to eat on that day. Seeing his pitiable state, the man bought a packet of lunch from a stall and gave it to the boy. The boy thanked him and sat on a seat. He opened the packet and started to eat in a hurry. The man was sure that the boy was really hungry and turned to the pages of a book he was reading.
                            Suddenly he noticed that the boy had abruptly stopped eating and was packing the rest of the meal in a hurry. The man assumed that the boy was preparing to throw away the rest of the meal into the waste bin. He rose from his seat and angrily asked the boy why he was not eating the full meal. The boy was in tears. He told the man that he just remembered his younger sister who had nothing to eat on that day. In his exhaustion, he had started the meal forgetting her fate and was sorry for that. He ran with the packet to his home to share his meal with his hungry sister.
                             Mother Teresa once said about her unforgettable experience in a poor family in Calcutta. One day she learned that a poor Hindu family with several children was starving for several days. She rushed to the family, carrying in her hands a bag of rice for the family. The mother of the family thankfully received the bag of rice. The starving woman then divided the rice in the bag into two halves and went out with one half of the rice.
                            When she returned, Mother Teresa asked her where she had gone. The woman replied that she went to give a share of the rice to a neighbouring Muslim family which was in a similar state of poverty and starvation. Mother Teresa was touched by the love and compassion of the poor lady which made her share her meagre assets with her starving neighbours. She was happy to see them enjoy the joy of sharing.
                             Albert Schweitzer thought and wrote about the "fellowship of those who bear the mark of pain." Those outside this fellowship usually have great difficulty in understanding what lies behind the pain.
                             We should display three major qualities: Daring, Caring and Sharing. We should have the courage to practise what we preach and should show care and kindness to each other, especially to the weak, the sick and the poor. We should be ready to share our possessions with those in greater need. Sir Winston Churchill said, "We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give."

                             The Bible teaches, "Our love should not be just words and talk; it must be true love, which shows itself in action....God is love and whoever lives in love lives in union with God and God lives in union with him."

                             Love is a language that can be heard by the deaf, seen by the blind and felt even by the new-born and the mentally retarded.
                             We may give without loving; but we cannot love without giving. Love is giving all we can. Love is like a smile - neither has any value unless given away. Karl Menninger said, "Love cures people - both the ones who give it and the ones who receive it." Mother Teresa said, "It is not how much you do, but how much love you put into what you do that counts."
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© By: Prof. Dr. Babu Philip, Darsana Academy, Kottayam-686001, Kerala, India ( Former Professor, Cochin University of Science & Technology, Fine Arts Avenue, Kochi-682016, Kerala, India), Prof. Mrs. Rajamma Babu, Former Professor, St. Dominic's College, Kanjirappally,  Leo. S. John, St. Antony's Public School, Anakkal, Kanjirappally and Neil John, Maniparambil, Ooriyakunnath, Kunnumbhagom, Kanjirappally, Kottayam-686507, Kerala, India.
For more moral stories, parables and anecdotes for students kindly visit our web-site:
This is Story No. 220 in this site. Please click ‘Older Posts’ at the bottom of a page to read previous stories and click 'Newer Posts' at the bottom of a page to read newer stories in this site. Please click on a word in the 'Story Themes' to read stories on that theme. 

Monday, October 13, 2014

THE DEVIL AND A DONKEY


                             The Book of Genesis in the Holy Bible depicts the story of the ‘Great Flood’ by which God wiped out the wicked people from the earth. He was pleased with Noah and so He decided to save him and his family from the flood.  God ordered him to build an ark, a large wooden boat with ample rooms to accommodate and maintain representatives of every species of terrestrial animals and birds. Noah worked with his wife, his three sons- Shem, Ham and Japheth and their wives and constructed the huge ark. Then, following the directions of God, Noah and his sons brought pairs of all animals near the ark and marched them into the ark.
                             In a humorous legend, which is entirely fictitious, a stubborn donkey refused to enter the ark. Noah and his sons had to drag the adamant animal into the ark, overcoming his stupid resistance. In one version of the legend, Ham, a son of Noah furiously shouted to the donkey, “Oh, you devil, come into the ark” while pulling him with all his might.   
                            The Devil, who was awaiting an invitation to enter the ark accepted these impulsive words as an invitation and readily entered the ark. Though the story is entirely fictitious, the Bible states that Ham later came under the influence of the Devil and was tempted to treat his father Noah with disrespect. This evil act led to a historic curse. Noah cursed Ham that his descendants would become the slaves of his brothers’ descendants.
                            Harsh words, uttered impulsively can have disastrous consequences. Unkind words may cause deep wounds in the minds of those who hear them but wisely spoken words can heal.
                            Let us learn to be quick to listen, but slow to speak and slow to become angry. Let us be kind and tender-hearted to one another, and forgive one another.                         ……………………………………………………………………
© By: Prof. Dr. Babu Philip, Darsana Academy, Kottayam-686001, Kerala, India ( Former Professor, Cochin University of Science & Technology, Fine Arts Avenue, Kochi-682016, Kerala, India), Prof. Mrs. Rajamma Babu, Former Professor, St. Dominic's College, Kanjirappally,  Leo. S. John, St. Antony's Public School, Anakkal, Kanjirappally and Neil John, Maniparambil, Ooriyakunnath, Kunnumbhagom, Kanjirappally, Kottayam-686507, Kerala, India.
For more moral stories, parables and anecdotes for students kindly visit our web-site: