Monday, September 19, 2016

PEDIATRIC DOSE


                  A child studying in the first standard developed severe fever at night. His mother searched the shelf for a pediatric syrup of paracetamol. But the bottle was almost empty. She had a stock of tablets of paracetamol (500 mg). The child liked plantains very much. His mother broke a tablet into halves, peeled a plantain carefully and pushed one half of the tablet (250 mg) into the plantain. She covered the fruit with the peel and gave it to the child. Later, to know whether her trick had worked, she asked him, “How was the plantain, dear?” He replied, “The plantain was delicious, Mommy, but the seed was bitter. So I spat out the seed and ate the fruit.”
                           A vain lady asked the Vicar, “Father, today I spent a lot of time before the mirror, watching my image and wondering how beautiful I am. Is that misbehaviour, Father?” The Vicar told her, “Your action has a different name. It was not misbehaviour; it was a case of misunderstanding!”
                  A young man had to return alone to the place of his work in a distant country, a week after his wedding. He wrote his first loving letter to his beloved wife with his own hands to give it a personal touch. In the letter, he addressed her as ‘my better half.’ But unfortunately, he had a very bad and illegible handwriting. She read his loving address as: MY BITTER HALF’. That initiated a quarrel which gradually intensified and ended in their divorce.
                  A moment of misunderstanding or misinterpretation may be very disastrous and may make a couple forget the millions of memorable moments spent together.               
                  It is wrong to draw conclusions until we know all the facts. His Grace the Most Rev. Philipose Mar Chrysostom Mar Thoma Valiya Metropolitan and former Head of the Mar Thoma Syrian Church, once remarked humorously, “Three unmarried girls are responsible for most of the troubles in the world. These miscreants are: Misunderstanding, Misinterpretation and Misrepresentation.” Because these three words start with ‘Mis’, they were described humorously by the Metropolitan as ‘Miss’ troublemakers.





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© By: Prof. Dr. Babu Philip, Former Professor, Cochin University of Science & Technology, Fine Arts Avenue, Kochi-682016, Kerala, India, Prof. Mrs. Rajamma Babu, Former Professor, St. Dominic's College, Kanjirappally,  Leo. S. John, St. Antony's Public School, Anakkal, Kanjirappally and Neil John, Maniparambil, Alfeen Public School, Kanjirappally, Kerala, India. 
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Monday, April 25, 2016

THE ART, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY OF TEACHING

THE  ART,  SCIENCE  AND TECHNOLOGY  OF  TEACHING


(By Prof. Dr. Babu Philip,
 Former Professor of Marine Biochemistry and Research Guide,
Department of Marine Biology, Microbiology and Biochemistry,
Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi-682016, Kerala, India.)

                          We gather information through the sense organs. The relative contribution of each faculty is:  1 % through taste,
1.5 % through touch, 3.5 % through smell, 11 % through hearing and 83 % through sight. This shows the importance of visual and verbal media in classroom communication.

A…TEACHING APPLIANCES

1…OVERHEAD PROJECTOR

            Words and figures are either written with marker pens or printed on transparent sheets for projection. The choice of colours and contrast need special attention. Highlighting of major ideas is more effective than crowding of ideas. The size of letters should be adjusted to enable clear reading by all in the hall. Use of pointer or laser pointer is essential while explaining a point but avoid projecting the full text of a lecture and reading the matter without eye contact with the audience. Switch off the projector when not in use.

2…COMPUTER-AIDED PROJECTION

        Teaching materials prepared using programmes like
‘PowerPoint’ and ‘Flash’ and projected directly onto the screen (eg. Using LCD or LED projector) are becoming very common. The choice of colour and size of letters, background colours, animation and sound effects requires careful planning and trial before every presentation.  Highlighting of major ideas with minimum words and clear illustrations is better than excessive writing.
     
3…CHALK BOARD AND WHITE BOARD

                     Use of writing boards requires careful planning and     practice. Special attention should be given to the size, colour and depth of letters. The space between letters, words and lines should be adjusted for clear and easy reading even by those seated at the back of the audience. Underlining or use of special and brilliant colours can highlight salient points. Avoid excessive writing and present the major points with minimum words and effective illustrations.
Avoid errors in spelling, grammar and punctuation. Use a pointer to explain without obstruction. Erase the writing after explaining each idea.

B…LOW-COST AND NO-COST VISUAL MEDIA

       During a lecture, visual media may be exhibited to draw the attention of the audience. These include objects, specimens, models, photos, pictures, diagrams, charts, graphs, maps etc.
The presentation should be relevant and clearly visible to everyone. Use of flannel graph requires careful preparation. Clearly written words, neatly drawn diagrams, etc. on drawing paper with pieces of emery paper glued to the back can be effectively projected on a spread sheet of flannel and exhibited before the audience with good versatility. The materials can be removed and replaced by new sheets easily during a lecture.

C…TEACHER AS AN AUDIOVISUAL MEDIUM 

       Display a positive attitude of interest and enthusiasm and begin the lecture by greeting the audience with a smile.
The teacher should be clearly visible to the audience. While lecturing your eyes should observe the face of everyone in the audience. Based on the feedback you receive from their faces, modify the presentation suitably. Avoid unnecessary focus on the notes or the projected material. Display a pleasant facial expression as a reflection of a positive and pleasant attitude to the subject and the audience. The facial expression should change naturally to suit the topic being presented. Avoid unnecessary gestures, distracting mannerisms and stereotyped movements. Your movements before the audience should be meaningful, natural and purposeful. Practise in front of a tall mirror or a close friend and use the feedback to correct your posture and movements during a lecture.

D…VERBAL MEDIA

    Modulate the volume, pitch, tone and pace of the voice for a natural and conversational style of presentation. The lecture should be clearly audible to everyone in the audience. Vary the pace or speed of presentation to suit the grasping ability of the audience and the complexity of the subject. Avoid very rapid talk. Occasional pause and repetition may be needed to introduce novel and difficult ideas.
        The language must be simple, pleasing and interesting. Use correct, meaningful and short sentences. Use a simple, direct, pleasing and interesting natural style and avoid a hard or bombastic style. The pronunciation should be correct, clear and natural and not overstylish or erroneous. Use a tape-recorder or a friend’s guidance to evaluate and modify your voice and mode of presentation.
        Your response to the questions from the audience must be encouraging and tolerant. Invite questions and clarifications with confidence. If the answer to a question is not known to you, display the humility to accept your inability and seek an expert’s opinion to get the correct answer.
          Explanations of difficult concepts should be simple, varied and meaningful and at the correct level of the audience.  Present suitable examples, incidents and experiences to explain difficult ideas. They should be relevant, familiar, interesting, simple and brief and capable of arousing curiosity. Use relevant anecdotes and short stories to make your narration interesting and meaningful.
          Develop and display a strong sense of humour and maintain a healthy, pleasant relationship with the audience.

E…PLANNING AND PREPARATON

        Effective teaching needs intensive planning and extensive preparation. Suitable teaching media have to be designed and prepared sufficiently early. Illustrative anecdotes and examples are very helpful to clarify difficult ideas.  The ideas and media should be arranged and presented in a logical sequence.
         The matter and manner of presentation should be appropriate to the needs and background of the audience. Management of time needs special attention.

F…CONCLUSION

            The conclusion should include a summary of the salient points presented and suggestions to apply the information.
With creative efforts and constant practice we can develop efficient and effective skills of communication for an impressive presentation.
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© By: Prof. Dr. Babu Philip, Former Professor, Cochin University of Science & Technology, Fine Arts Avenue, Kochi-682016, Kerala, India, Prof. Mrs. Rajamma Babu, Former Professor, St. Dominic's College, Kanjirappally,  Leo. S. John, St. Antony's Public School, Anakkal, Kanjirappally and Neil John, Maniparambil, Alfeen Public School, Kanjirappally, Kerala, India. 
For more moral stories, parables and anecdotes for students kindly visit our web-site:

This is Story No. 233 in this site. Please click ‘Older Posts’ at the bottom of a page to read previous stories and click 'Newer Posts' at the bottom of a page to read newer stories in this site. Please click on a word in the 'Story Themes' to read stories on that theme. 

Friday, November 20, 2015

FAILING FAMILIES



                Tom told his friend Alex, “I am going to divorce my wife.”
Alex asked, “Why? Whose fault is it?
 Tom said, “50% of the fault is my wife’s.”
“Then whose is the other 50%?”  Alex asked.
Tom replied, “That is her mother’s !”
                A little boy was studying his lessons at home. His mother was cooking in the kitchen. He asked her, “Mommy, can divorce come before marriage?” She said, “Never.” He continued, But Mommy, see this book. Here divorce appears before marriage. “ She examined the book and explained with a smile, “ But that is a dictionary, dear. It never happens in real life.”
                Differences in opinion and outlook are natural when two different persons live together. Problems can be solved easily by a free and frank discussion in an atmosphere of love. Instead, minor problems may grow and assume larger dimensions when others get involved in it and complicate the situation. Many quarrels which start on minor  issues may flare up, leading to violence or divorce.
                Real happiness results only when there is close co-operation and mutual respect between partners. Otherwise the better half becomes the bitter half.  It is said that marriages are conceived in heaven and celebrated on earth. The ideal family is an image of heaven. Husband and wife are equal before God and have equal rights and responsibilities to make their family a heaven of happiness. They should render hearty support to each other even during disappointment, disability, discomfort, distress, disease or disaster. Matrimony is a source of divine grace. Marital partners participate in God's act of creation. Their attitudes and actions should be complementary and not contradictory. . The five letters in the word ‘FAMILY’ represent the first letters of the words in the meaningful phrase- ‘Father And Mother ILove, Year-round’.
                 Marital love is a great gift of God. It should be active year-round. It should be active, constant, continuous and equally strong during all seasons of the year- lasting till the last moment of life.




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© By: Prof. Dr. Babu Philip, Former Professor, Cochin University of Science & Technology, Fine Arts Avenue, Kochi-682016, Kerala, India, Prof. Mrs. Rajamma Babu, Former Professor, St. Dominic's College, Kanjirappally,  Leo. S. John, St. Antony's Public School, Anakkal, Kanjirappally and Neil John, Maniparambil, Alfeen Public School, Kanjirappally, Kerala, India. 
For more moral stories, parables and anecdotes for students kindly visit our web-site:

This is Story No. 232 in this site. Please click ‘Older Posts’ at the bottom of a page to read previous stories and click 'Newer Posts' at the bottom of a page to read newer stories in this site. Please click on a word in the 'Story Themes' to read stories on that theme. 

Thursday, August 13, 2015

FIVE FIGHTING FINGERS



            The five fingers on a hand had a heated argument one day. Each finger argued that he was the most important member of their family.
            The thumb finger started his claim: “I am absolutely essential for eating, writing and for grasping any object by the hand. Moreover, holding the thumb up is a universal symbol of victory. I am sucked by babies and then I shower motherly affection and consolation on them.”
            The index (fore) finger was the next to speak. He argued, “I am essential to point to any object and to accuse a person. Speakers use me to express ideas emphatically and to point at people with power. I am raised above all of you to indicate that a thing is the first and the best.”
            The middle finger asserted,” I am definitely the longest among us and so I am the natural leader of this family. I have the maximum dignity and I always have two of you to guard me on either side. You cannot question my status or stature.”
            The ring finger said, “I am the symbol of love, romance, marriage and family life. I am decorated with a golden ring during engagement and marriage, the greatest and most memorable moments of one’s life. I shine among you like a king wearing a royal, golden crown.”
            The little finger was waiting for his chance. He said, “I am the smallest, but I am not the least or the last. As the baby of the family, I deserve special care and consideration. Undoubtedly I am the most beautiful finger with a lovely tenderness and a lively grace. When the hands are folded during a prayer or expression of respect, I stay in front of all of you as the leader. Obviously, I am the greatest.”
            The arguments continued and they were about to start a physical fight, when the owner of the hand intervened to make peace. He convinced them that each finger was equally important. He told them, “Each of you is essential to me. Each of you is helpless and useless without the assistance of the others. God created you differently but when you act together, you can achieve what is impossible individually. No one is weak or unimportant. Each one has unique abilities and importance. We can achieve victory only by a collective effort, close cooperation and team-work.
For example, when you act in harmony, you can operate different tools and equipment, make novel and wonderful articles, construct objects and buildings, create artistic works of great beauty, play musical instruments and help others who need your assistance.”
            The enlightened fingers promised that they would remain in harmony and cooperate to help others.


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© By: Prof. Dr. Babu Philip, Former Professor, Cochin University of Science & Technology, Fine Arts Avenue, Kochi-682016, Kerala, India, Prof. Mrs. Rajamma Babu, Former Professor, St. Dominic's College, Kanjirappally,  Leo. S. John, St. Antony's Public School, Anakkal, Kanjirappally and Neil John, Maniparambil, Alfeen Public School, Kanjirappally, Kerala, India. 
For more moral stories, parables and anecdotes for students kindly visit our web-site:

This is Story No. 231 in this site. Please click ‘Older Posts’ at the bottom of a page to read previous stories and click 'Newer Posts' at the bottom of a page to read newer stories in this site. Please click on a word in the 'Story Themes' to read stories on that theme. 

Tuesday, July 14, 2015

A WISE WIFE

               Beruriah was the learned, intelligent, pious, tactful, witty and wise wife of the saintly Jewish Rabbi, Meir who lived in the second century AD. On a Sabbath day, while Rabbi Meir was teaching in the house of study, his two beloved sons died accidentally. The Sabbath is observed as a very special and precious day by all devout Jews. Beruriah did not want to grieve her husband on the Holy Sabbath day. She decided to wait till the end of the rituals of Sabbath to convey the tragic news to her husband. She also wanted to soften his sorrow and prevent a sudden shock to him by following an intelligent and tactful approach. She laid the dead bodies of their sons on a couch in the upper room of their residence and covered the still bodies with a sheet.

              When the Rabbi returned from the Academy after the Sabbath, he enquired about their sons, but she hid the news tactfully till he had completed the rituals of the Jewish religious ceremony of Havdalah. It involves the use of the five senses-tasting the wine, smelling sweet spices, seeing the light of the Havdalah candle, feeling the heat of its flame, and hearing the blessings. He pronounced the prescribed Blessings and finished the customary evening meal to mark the ceremonial end of the Sabbath. She then told him calmly, “A few years ago, a friend had given me a treasure of two precious ornaments to be kept under safe custody. I used to appreciate the treasure and love them as if they were our own. But now the real owner of the treasure wants it back and has come to claim his property. Kindly advise me whether I should return them to the owner or not.” The Rabbi ruled emphatically, “You should return the treasure without any hesitation. That is the prime duty of one who holds a deposit.”

             She then led him through the stairs to the upper room and gently removed the sheet covering the precious bodies of their beloved children. She said, tearfully, “These are the ornaments God gave to us in trust to keep under our safe custody. He has now taken them back.” He expressed great grief and cried, but she reminded him of his earlier direction that one who holds a deposit should readily return it to the owner as soon as he demands it.  She quoted the following verse from the Book of Job: “The Lord gave, and now He has taken away. May His name be praised!” This tactful approach reduced his grief and he praised the wisdom of his wife which illuminated him and enabled him to withstand the great tragedy.
             Life after death is a reality. In the heaven of happiness reserved for the righteous, we will meet our loving Lord who created us to be with Him forever. It is said that when we are born, we cry and the people around us rejoice. When we die, people cry, and, if we are saved, we rejoice!  Man’s way leads to a hopeless end while God’s way leads to an endless hope. Everyone is equal before death as death comes to all - great and small.
             The world is like a garden and every person is like a precious flower. But God, the owner of the garden, has the right to pluck the flowers of his choice. That is what happens when our dear ones die. Death is a moment of sorrow for everyone close to the dead person. In the sorrow, we may cry and complain to God why he has taken our dear ones away from us. But let us believe that one dies when he is called by God to His abode. Often the best flowers are plucked earlier.
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© By: Prof. Dr. Babu Philip, Former Professor, Cochin University of Science & Technology, Fine Arts Avenue, Kochi-682016, Kerala, India, Prof. Mrs. Rajamma Babu, Former Professor, St. Dominic's College, Kanjirappally,  Leo. S. John, St. Antony's Public School, Anakkal, Kanjirappally and Neil John, Maniparambil, Alfeen Public School, Kanjirappally, Kerala, India. 
For more moral stories, parables and anecdotes for students kindly visit our web-site:
This is Story No. 230 in this site. Please click ‘Older Posts’ at the bottom of a page to read previous stories and click 'Newer Posts' at the bottom of a page to read newer stories in this site. Please click on a word in the 'Story Themes' to read stories on that theme.